About the Grey Muzzle Organization

Gray Dog Club is pleased to have the Grey Muzzle Organization as it's premium partner. This wonderful organization helps homeless senior dogs by providing funding & resources to Senior Dogs. Every month a  portion of the membership proceeds go to dogs in need. 

 

The Grey Muzzle Organization improves the lives of at-risk senior dogs by providing funding and resources to animal shelters, rescue organizations, sanctuaries, and other non-profit groups nationwide.

  • The old dogs that share our hearts and homes are part of our family. Sadly, many old dogs are not that fortunate. Senior dogs slow down. They develop medical issues. And many find themselves alone, afraid, and at-risk in shelters across the country. The Grey Muzzle Organization creates happy endings to these heartbreaking stories--on a national scale.

 

  • The Grey Muzzle Organization helps homeless and at-risk senior dogs by providing grants and other resources to animal welfare organizations nationwide. In 2016 we awarded more than $225,000 in grants to 38 animal welfare organizations representing 25 states.

 

  • The Grey Muzzle Organization grants support a variety of programs and services, including hospice care for senior dogs, Senior for Senior adoption programs, medical and dental care, beds for old dogs at shelters, and education programs to encourage adoption and quality care of senior dogs.

 

  • In 2016 we added a number of new grantees offering innovative programs, including one grantee that offers swimming lessons and hydrotherapy to senior shelter dogs, another focused specifically on treating and rehabilitating senior dogs from puppy mills, and yet another dedicated to helping terminally ill people care for—and ultimately find new homes for—their senior dogs.

 

  • Since 2008, Grey Muzzle has provided over $750,000 in grants to 76 nonprofit organizations in 30 states in support of our “vision of a world where no old dog dies alone and afraid.”

 

  • There is no other national organization currently doing what The Grey Muzzle Organization does. There is a small but growing number of rescues focused specifically on senior dogs.

 

  • The Grey Muzzle Organization depends on the generosity of our individual and corporate donors to make stories like Charlie’s possible.

Values

  1. We believe old dogs contribute positively to our quality of life and have much to teach us about patience, respect, responsibility, loyalty and unconditional love.
  2. We believe every senior dog deserves to live out their golden years, months, weeks or even days in a place of love, security and peace.
  3. We believe dogs are not a disposable commodity; rather, they depend on us to care for them through all stages of their lives.
  4. We believe at times it is appropriate to make an end-of-life decision based on a deteriorating quality of life or if the dog is harmful to itself or others.
  5. We believe in working with diverse organizations from across the country that share our fundamental values.
  6. We believe in honest and open decision making that allows us to be accountable to our donors and the organizations we support.
  7. We believe in providing educational support, advocacy, and sharing of best practices for those who support senior dogs.

VISIT THE GREY MUZZLE ORGANIZATION AND LEARN MORE!

If you’re fortunate, you have lived, or currently live, with an old dog. As cherished companions, the old dogs in our lives enrich our days for as long as we are privileged to have them.

You may find it inconceivable then that a treasured member of the family would be tossed away when signs of old age appear, when extra care is required, or after the kids leave home. But this is an all too common occurrence. Old dogs are left at shelters, or simply turned loose or left behind, confused and frightened. Abandonment can also happen right at home - old dogs who are no longer wanted are sometimes banished to the garage or exiled to the back yard with little human companionship. And sadly, sometimes people or families who love their old dog are forced to give the dog up due to difficult circumstances.

At this time, there are very few rescue groups in the United States that specialize in helping homeless senior dogs, though the issue of geriatric rescue dogs is found in every municipal animal shelter and humane society, and with rescue leagues of all shapes and sizes. There is a great need for special programs that are unique to old dogs, such as in-home hospice care or health care programs for dogs in loving homes that may need a little financial assistance as their dog ages. We believe much more can be done.